FDA Alerts Public to Risks of Recalled Infant Formula

FDA Alerts Public to Risks of Recalled Infant Formula
FDA Alerts Public to Risks of Recalled Infant Formula. Credit | AP Photo

United States: Parents are being advised by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regarding an child formula made from scapegoat milk that may be defiled with a bacteria that poses a serious threat to babies.

Safety Caution

The FDA cautioned in a statement released on Friday that the Crecelac brand formula, which has been recalled since May 24, may contain Cronobacter, which “can cause bloodstream and central nervous system infections, such as sepsis and meningitis” in infants.

In addition, two other Farmalac brands are being recalled due to noncompliance with FDA safety rules.

Recall Details

The three major recall brands are:

Net weight: 12.4 oz (352g) CRECELAC INFANT Powdered Goat Milk Infant Formula with Iron, ages 0 to 12 months

Farmalac BABY Powdered Infant Formula with Iron, Net Weight: 12.4 oz (352g), Ages 0 to 12 months

Farmalac BABY Powdered Infant Formula with Iron Low Lactose, Net Weight: 12.4 oz (352g), Ages 0 to 12 months

Retail Distribution

“Some retail stores in Texas and, possibly, additional locations in the U.S. are selling the infant formulas,” the FDA stated.

” At this time, the FDA isn’t apprehensive of any ails associated with these products and the FDA doesn’t anticipate any impact on the force of child formula grounded on the recall of these products,” the FDA stated.

The FDA discovered that the manufacturer of the Crecelac scapegoat milk formula hadn’t followed agency safety guidelines, which led to the formula’s recall on May 24.

Response and Risks

On Friday, however, the FDA announced that it “is now issuing this [new] safety alert due to new findings of Cronobacter contamination in a sample of Crecelac Infant Powdered Goat Milk Infant Formula.”

Regarding the two Farmalac formulae that are also recalled, the FDA stated that although no Cronobacter has been found in either brand, the recall is being carried out “due to their noncompliance with U.S. infant formula regulations.”

 Alternative Options

Initial symptoms of a Cronobacter bacterial infection in an infant include “poor feeding, irritability, temperature changes, jaundice, grunting breaths or abnormal body movements,” according to the FDA.

Parents should contact a doctor if their baby has these symptoms so that the child can get medical attention right away.

Since there are goat milk formulas that do fulfill FDA criteria, the agency advised caregivers that “if they are looking for an alternative goat milk infant formula for sale in the U.S., they may wish to speak with their infant’s health care provider.”